?

Log in

Idiots May Hold Ostriches - The Book of the Celestial Cow

> Recent Entries
> Archive
> Friends
> Profile
> My Website

August 17th, 2006


Previous Entry Share Next Entry
11:53 am - Idiots May Hold Ostriches
As you all know, my opinion is worth more than everyone else's. In a recent Gallup poll, respondents were asked to choose between the following two options:

  • The opinion of spectralbovine is worth more than everyone else's.
  • I would like to be eaten by a rhinoceros.

    100% of respondents chose the first option!

    Here are three things, then, that have received my stamp of approval.

    1. My hands:



    The little doodle is supposed to be a magnifying glass.

    2. This fanvid, set to "Eat It" by Weird Al and consisting entirely of scenes with FOOD:



    This is almost certainly the funniest fanvid the Veronica Mars fandom has ever seen. The Veronica Mars cast/food is my new OTP. Rob had this to say:
    Yeah, that was pretty great.

    We always (playfully) mock Enrico's performance on that last line...

    "The line, it's a-very small, but the performance is a-so big."

    Thank you, wily_one24. Thank you. Go leave her feedback!

    3. The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay, by Michael Chabon:

    This is one of those books people have been recommending for ages, and I know the Pulitzer Prize doesn't hold much weight after you've read The Shipping News, but I was assured that this was a good book. I was not steered wrong, thankfully.

    People always blah-di-blah about how gorgeous Michael Chabon's prose is, and I was all, "Whatever," and then I actually read the book, and now I'm all, "Oh." Because the language dances in this man's hands, guys. I can't find a selection to properly illustrate this because that's not how it works. It's just the whole book. The way every sentence has an energy, despite the mundaneness of what's going on. What's beautiful about the book is the sense of style, the wryly omniscient narration that knows all that has gone on, all that is going on, and all that will come to pass. You don't mind digressions because you feel like you're in the hands of a master storyteller, someone who's spinning a good yarn, elocuting around the campfire.

    In a nutshell, the book is about Joe Kavalier and Sam Clay, two Jewish cousins who create the popular and influential comic book character, the Escapist. The backdrop is World War II. It is about their travails in the industry. But it's really much more than that. What I loved about the story was how intensely human it was. It was not the story of America During the War. It was their story. You see how individuals, the little people, were affected.

    About two-thirds of the way through, the narrative takes a radical turn, and it kind of lost me. You shouldn't have two hundred pages of denoument. It recovers by the end, and I kind of understand why (some of) it was necessary, but it kept me from loving the book as much as I could have. Because I was becoming really engrossed in the world and the lives of the characters before things went a bit haywire.

    All in all, however, it's a great book, especially if you're a comic book fan. These days, whenever someone asks for a book recommendation, I immediately recommend The Time Traveler's Wife. Now, I have another book to recommend as well.
    Current Mood: gigglygiggly
    Current Music: Raconteurs - Steady, as She Goes
  • (53 memoirs | Describe me as "inscrutable")

    Comments:


    [User Picture]
    From:dark_roast
    Date:August 17th, 2006 07:01 pm (UTC)
    (Link)
    Well, you liked Descent, and hated Pulse -- so, yes. I also select Option A. For now. *searches e-bay for a rhino gun*
    [User Picture]
    From:upanashad
    Date:August 17th, 2006 07:02 pm (UTC)
    (Link)
    "The line, it's a-very small, but the performance is a-so big."


    Hee!
    [User Picture]
    From:soundingsea
    Date:August 17th, 2006 07:08 pm (UTC)
    (Link)
    You *liked* The Time Traveler's Wife?

    .
    .
    .

    Apparently we approach and appreciate books differently. I detested the sense of unchangable destiny, the treacly tear-jerking, and the whiplash of jumping around in time which characterize that book.
    [User Picture]
    From:spectralbovine
    Date:August 17th, 2006 07:25 pm (UTC)
    (Link)
    I loved it, and it immediately became one of my favorite books.

    I don't think there was a sense of unchangable destiny. I mean, Henry even gives Clara a list of where to meet him, essentially creating his own destiny...well, by making it fit his timeline. I think the sense was more of a mix of destiny and free will, which fits my own worldview. I was impressed with how skillfully plotted the whole timeline was and didn't mind the whiplash. As for the treacly tear-jerking, I think it's a book that manages to coast along on the strength of its prose for pages of nothing happening.
    [User Picture]
    From:allthelivesofme
    Date:August 17th, 2006 07:37 pm (UTC)
    (Link)
    Note to self: look for the Michael Chabon novel on the next bookstore-run.

    And I've heard a lot of good things about The Time Traveler's Wife, but haven't read it yet. I'm a sucker for time-travel romances, though. *clutches copy of Somewhere in Time* I kinda wish that they'd kept Matheson's original title, Bid Time Return, for the movie, though. I love that title.
    (Deleted comment)
    [User Picture]
    From:spectralbovine
    Date:August 17th, 2006 07:50 pm (UTC)
    (Link)
    You forget that the actual eating can involve any sort of poking, goring, and stomping that the rhinoceros wishes to engage in during the meal.
    (Deleted comment)
    [User Picture]
    From:spectralbovine
    Date:August 17th, 2006 07:51 pm (UTC)
    (Link)
    It could be a magnifying glass. My teenage cousin didn't try very hard.
    (Deleted comment)
    [User Picture]
    From:spectralbovine
    Date:August 17th, 2006 07:54 pm (UTC)
    (Link)
    I loved how the vidder used the naked Tritons during the "get a banana, get a whole bunch" line.
    See, I loved that too...and then I realized the real reason she used that scene was the picture of a bunch of bananas on the door, and I laughed even more.

    Even though the story didn't go there. :)
    Well, it kind of did, in the end. Just not the way you were thinking. I think it seems to have been proven time and time again that false hope is better than no hope. Even if the hope is proven false, it gives you something to live for. And can hope really be false? The hope is genuine. It's the outcome that's fluid.
    [User Picture]
    From:silentsiren47
    Date:August 17th, 2006 07:51 pm (UTC)
    (Link)
    I liked Kavalier and Clay, but not as much as I thought I would. However, his first book, The Mysteries of Pittsburgh, is awesome, and you should read it.
    [User Picture]
    From:spectralbovine
    Date:August 17th, 2006 07:54 pm (UTC)
    (Link)
    Ooh. Thanks. How about Wonder Boys?
    [User Picture]
    From:mutinousmuse
    Date:August 17th, 2006 07:54 pm (UTC)
    (Link)
    Um, hello? Rhinoceroses so don't eat people. I call shenanigans on your poll, mister!
    [User Picture]
    From:spectralbovine
    Date:August 17th, 2006 07:55 pm (UTC)
    (Link)
    Rhinoceroses will do what I pay them to do, lady.
    From:(Anonymous)
    Date:August 17th, 2006 08:18 pm (UTC)
    (Link)
    About two-thirds of the way through, the narrative takes a radical turn, and it kind of lost me. You shouldn't have two hundred pages of denoument. It recovers by the end, and I kind of understand why (some of) it was necessary, but it kept me from loving the book as much as I could have. Because I was becoming really engrossed in the world and the lives of the characters before things went a bit haywire.

    Yeah, that last third is what led me to say "I had mixed feelings about the book" when you brought it up the other day (other week?). I was enjoying it a lot and then...not so much.
    [User Picture]
    From:jeeperstseepers
    Date:August 17th, 2006 08:18 pm (UTC)
    (Link)
    Um, that was me.
    From:wee_warrior
    Date:August 17th, 2006 09:29 pm (UTC)
    (Link)
    *sob* But I like The Shipping News... nevermind, I loved Kavalier and Clay, too, so we can still freely talk to each other.
    (Deleted comment)
    [User Picture]
    From:spectralbovine
    Date:August 17th, 2006 10:54 pm (UTC)
    (Link)
    IT'S A MAGNIFYING GLASS.
    (Deleted comment)
    (Deleted comment)
    [User Picture]
    From:horsefacehannah
    Date:August 18th, 2006 12:07 am (UTC)
    (Link)
    Man, the middle three or so parts of K&C are possible my favorite in any book. I saw Lobster Alice the other day and all I could think of was Dali getting stuck in the underwater suit!
    And the Time Traveler's Wife rules too.
    [User Picture]
    From:spectralbovine
    Date:August 18th, 2006 12:10 am (UTC)
    (Link)
    And I like how randomly later in the book, he describes the pen as "the pen that saved Salvador Dali's life."
    [User Picture]
    From:alannaofdoom
    Date:August 18th, 2006 12:22 am (UTC)
    (Link)
    I have been meaning to read Kav & Clay for so long now. Like, three years or something.

    Also I hear great things about Mysteries of Pittsburg so I think I'll give that one a shot, too. [goes to bookstore]


    In an amazing instance of serendipity, I am taking next Wednesday off work because I have to run lights for a matinee performance. Thus, my plan: Re-watch VMars s1 this weekend. Purchase s2 on Tuesday, if I can manage to fight my way through the (doubtless) legions of adoring fans clamoring for the dvds. Begin watching s2. (Sleep, maybe.) Run lights. Return home and resume watching s2.

    I am excited.
    [User Picture]
    From:punzerel
    Date:August 18th, 2006 01:09 am (UTC)
    (Link)
    I liked Michael Chabon! You should read Summerland as well.

    Also, that is the zillionth recommendation I've seen for TTTW, so I may just pick it up. Hmmm.
    [User Picture]
    From:glasseseater
    Date:August 18th, 2006 01:17 am (UTC)
    (Link)
    I was totally about to ask you for book recommendations. Creepy.
    [User Picture]
    From:spectralbovine
    Date:August 18th, 2006 03:36 am (UTC)
    (Link)
    I am creepy! Anonyrats have said so!
    [User Picture]
    From:briasoleil
    Date:August 18th, 2006 01:18 am (UTC)
    (Link)
    I just sent the French titles with translation and my comments to the thepch.net email. I'd really appreciate any comments or feedback you might have.
    [User Picture]
    From:sterope
    Date:August 18th, 2006 02:22 am (UTC)
    (Link)
    Wow, someone spent a lot of time on that video! It's really well edited though, so good job, someone. I wish I had smarter books to recommend other than Harry Potter. I really do, but not that many...
    [User Picture]
    From:queenrikki_hp
    Date:August 18th, 2006 03:33 am (UTC)
    (Link)

    3. The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay, by Michael Chabon:

    I love this book. It's been years since I've read it, but I absolutely adore it. Though I've always thought that it's much better read for comics fans than for nonfans but I've never gotten a chance to test this theory.
    [User Picture]
    From:wily_one24
    Date:August 18th, 2006 06:50 am (UTC)
    (Link)
    Okay, so... thank you for the rec (and for turning me into the biggest squeeing fangirl ever).

    1. I totally choose Rhino.

    2. Have you tried "The God of Small Things" by Arundhati Roy? It's a good book.
    [User Picture]
    From:spectralbovine
    Date:August 18th, 2006 06:52 am (UTC)
    (Link)
    1. DISQUALIFIED!

    2. Nope. I've heard about it, though. I'll keep it in mind.
    [User Picture]
    From:tallisen
    Date:August 18th, 2006 08:25 pm (UTC)
    (Link)
    That video is priceless, fun to watch, and made me very hungry.
    [User Picture]
    From:alliterator
    Date:August 20th, 2006 04:46 pm (UTC)
    (Link)
    That video is excellent.

    I only read about a fourth of The Adventures of Kavalier and Clay because I got bored with it. But there's a new comic series out that is excellent called The Escapists by Brian K. Vaughan (who also writes Runaways and Ex Machina). It's not about the Escapist, but rather a normal guy who decides to remake the Escapist comic with some friends. It's an excellent read and the first issue is only a dollar.
    [User Picture]
    From:spectralbovine
    Date:August 20th, 2006 11:31 pm (UTC)
    (Link)
    I know who Vaughan is. We've had this conversation!

    For a while there, they were putting out the "actual" Escapist comic.

    The book gets much more interesting once they start making the comic. The first fourth is a little slow, I agree.
    [User Picture]
    From:vertigo66
    Date:August 21st, 2006 07:01 pm (UTC)
    (Link)
    Funny, I liked The Shipping News a lot, liked Kavalier and Clay (but admit I didn't actually finish the last 50 pages), didn't really care for The Time Traveler's Wife (it was riveting, but I felt it was ultimately manipulative). The best Pulitzer Prize winner I've read so far is Middlesex by Jeffrey Eugenides. It was just amazing.
    [User Picture]
    From:spectralbovine
    Date:August 21st, 2006 07:16 pm (UTC)
    (Link)
    I keep hearing about that book, and it took me a while to stop confusing it with Middlemarch.

    > Go to Top
    LiveJournal.com